Charcloth

Charcloth

Char-cloth is made from cotton material (scrap fabric, old undershirt material, rags, etc.) that has been wrapped in aluminum foil and put beneath a fire. As the fire burns and the the coals drop onto the foil, and the material inside chars.

It’s used with a spark striker and dry kindling (jute twine, pine needles, dryer lint, whatever) to start fires. The char cloth catches the spark and burns, lighting small tinder, small twigs, larger twigs, and upward in size until you have a nice, roaring fire.

Then, soon after, s’mores.

The Camp Cuisine

I found this really interesting; it is from the book “TRAIL CRAFT,” by Claude P. Fordyce and published in 1922.

Though dramatically heavier, inn M. Hunter’s and A.F. Wallace’s defense, they were writing specifically for prospectors in very cold northern climates, as were the KLONDIKE recommendations give by the Northern Pacific railroad company in the Chicago Record’s Book for Gold Seekers, 1897

“Jack Carr,” the famous Yukon mail carrier, has given a list for an outfit which, he says, will last one man one year in the Klondike district. This list follows:

  • Flour, pounds 400
  • Cornmeal, pounds 50
  • Rolled oats, pounds 50
  • Rice, pounds 35
  • Beans, pounds 100
  • Candles, pounds 40
  • Sugar, granulated, pounds 100
  • Baking powder, pounds 8
  • Bacon, pounds 200
  • Soda, pounds 2
  • Yeast cakes (6 in package) packages 6
  • Salt, pounds 15
  • Pepper, pounds 1
  • Mustard, pounds 1
  • Ginger, pounds 1
  • Apples, evaporated, pounds 25
  • Peaches, evaporated, pounds 25
  • Apricots, evaporated, pounds 25
  • Fish, pounds 25
  • Pitted plums, pounds 10
  • Raisins, pounds 10
  • Onions, evaporated, pounds 50
  • Potatoes, evaporated, pounds 50
  • Coflfee, pounds 24
  • Tea, pounds 5
  • Milk, condensed, dozen. 4
  • Soap, laundry, bars 5
  • Matches, packages 60
  • Soup vegetables, pounds 15
  • Butter, sealed, cans 25
  • Tobacco, at discretion
  • Stove, steel
  • Gold pan
  • Granite buckets, 1 nest of 4 .
  • Cups
  • Plates (tin)
  • Knives and forks, each
  • Spoons — tea and table
  • Whetstones
  • Coflfee pot
  • Pick and handle
  • Saw, hand
  • Saw, whip
  • Hatchet
  • Shovels, ^ spring 2
  • Nails, pounds 20
  • Files 3
  • Drawknife
  • Ax and handle
  • Chisels, 3 sizes 3
  • Butcher knife
  • Hammer
  • Compass
  • Jack plane
  • Square
  • Yukon sleigh
  • Lash rope, 1-inch, feet 60
  • Rope, 1/2 inch, feet 150
  • Pitch, pounds 15
  • Oakum, pounds 10
  • Frying pans 2
  • Woolen clothes.
  • Boots and shoes
  • Snow-glasses”